About the Challenge
The IMC Challenge powered by Huawei is an international program jointly initiated by Huawei and the International Mathematics Competition for University Students (IMC). This program gives math enthusiasts the opportunity to tackle real-world math problems faced by the industry, builds bridges between theoretical research in mathematics and the industry, and provides a platform for the exchange of ideas.
Huawei's support for this program is part of its ongoing commitment to opening up its research platforms that focus on future information terminals, computing, and connectivity. Huawei has and will continue to create opportunities for the next generation of problem solvers, as they explore challenging subject areas that advance science and technology and drive the industry to meet the needs of tomorrow.
Organizing Committee
Prof. John Jayne
Professor of Mathematics at University
College London
Founding President of the IMC
Dr. Zhou Hong
President of Institute of Strategic Research, Huawei
Liu Shaowei
President of European Research Institute, Huawei
Prof. Laurent Lafforgue
French Mathematician
Fields Medalist 2002
Professor at the Institute of Advanced
Scientific Studies (IHES)
Researcher at the Lagrange Mathematics &
Computing Research Center, Huawei
Prof. Chrisina Jayne
Dean of the School of Computing & Digital Technologies
at Teesside University in Middlesbrough, the UK
Director of Teesside University London
Senior Fellow of the British Higher Education Academy
Chartered IT Professional Fellow of the British Computer Society (BCS)
Immediate Past President of the International Neural Network Society (INNS)
Governor-at-Large of the INNS (2023-2025)
Prof. Dr. Figalli Alessio
Italian Mathematician
Fields Medalist 2018
FIM Director at ETH Zürich
Chaired Professor at ETH Zürich
Researcher at the Lagrange Mathematics & Computing Research
Center, Huawei
(Photo source:© ETH Zürich - Giulia Marthaler)
Dr. Jiang Peigang
Huawei Fellow
Chief Expert of Radio Access Network (RAN) Algorithm
Prof. Géza Kos
Hungarian Mathematician
Professor of Eötvös Loránd University
Gold Medalist with maximum score of
International Mathematical Olympiad two times
(Helsinki, 1985 and Warsaw,1986)
Dr. Michał Krych
Polish Mathematician
Samuel Dickstein Prize 2019 from the
Polish Academy of Sciences
Former Deputy Director of the
Institute of Mathematics of Warsaw University
Li Jia
Director of HUAWEI CLOUD Algorithm
Innovation Lab
Dr. Nie Zipei
Gold medalist of the 51th IMO with full score
Gold medalist of the 3rd Romanian Master of
Mathematics with full score
Researcher at the Lagrange Mathematics &
Computing Research Center, Huawei
Prof. John Jayne
Professor of Mathematics at
University College London
Founding President of the IMC
Dr. Zhou Hong
President of Institute of
Strategic Research, Huawei
Liu Shaowei
President of European Research
Institute, Huawei
Prof. Laurent Lafforgue
French Mathematician
Fields Medalist 2002
Professor at the Institute of
Advanced Scientific Studies (IHES)
Researcher at the Lagrange
Mathematics & Computing Research
Center, Huawei
Prof. Chrisina Jayne
Dean of the School of Computing
& Digital Technologies at Teesside
University in Middlesbrough,the UK
Director of Teesside University
London, Senior Fellow of the
British Higher Education Academy
and Chartered IT Professional
Fellow of the British Computer
Society (BCS) Immediate Past
President of the International
Neural Network Society (INNS)
Governor-at Large of the INNS
(2023-2025)
Prof. Dr. Figalli Alessio
Italian Mathematician
Fields Medalist 2018
FIM Director at ETH Zürich
Chaired Professor at ETH Zürich
Researcher at the Lagrange
Mathematics & Computing
Research Center, Huawei
(Photo source:© ETH Zürich - Giulia
Marthaler)
Dr. Jiang Peigang
Huawei Fellow
Chief Expert of Radio Access
Network (RAN) Algorithm
Prof. Géza Kos
Hungarian Mathematician
Professor of Eötvös Loránd
University
Gold Medalist with maximum score
of International Mathematical
] Olympiad two times (Helsinki,
1985 and Warsaw,1986)
Dr. Michał Krych
Polish Mathematician
Samuel Dickstein Prize 2019
from the
Polish Academy of Sciences
Former Deputy Director of the
Institute of Mathematics of
Warsaw University
Li Jia
Director of HUAWEI CLOUD
Algorithm Innovation Lab
Dr. Nie Zipei
Gold medalist of the 51th IMO
with full score
Gold medalist of the 3rd
Romanian Master of
Mathematics with full score
Researcher at the Lagrange
Mathematics & Computing
Research Center, Huawei
About the Problems

This Challenge covers three problems. Each problem will be released on a different date and have its own reward plan. Contestants can choose to work on one or more of the problems.

(The Organizing Committee has decided that Problem B and Problem C for this Challenge will be released at later dates than planned, considering that there are multiple holidays worldwide at the beginning of this year, and that many contestants working on Problem A have also expressed interest in Problems B and C. We hope that this postponement will give contestants more time to take a break, think, and tackle the problems. For more information about the new dates of Problem B and Problem C, see the problem timelines below.)

Problem A

Data Center Network
Multipath Load Balancing

Problem B

Spatial Estimation
and Separation

Problem C

Multi-Parameter Wireless Network
Optimization Based on Coverage Simulation

Problem A

Data Center Network
Multipath Load Balancing

Problem A introduction:

Network transmission is one of the key part of distributed storage systems. Network transmission performance directly affects the comprehensive performance of storage systems. Proper network transmission protocols can effectively reduce network latency and tail latency, improve bandwidth utilization, and reduce network jitter. Currently, there are multiple interconnected physical links between most nodes in cloud data centers. Traditional single-path transmission protocols cannot fully utilize the advantages of multi-path transmission. Therefore, how to make full use of the multiple existing physical links to perform multipath transmission and implement load balancing between the multiple links becomes a key to reducing a network transmission latency. Then, implementing an appropriate multipath load balancing algorithm presents a significant challenge.In order to solve these challenges, the contestants need to design a transmission protocol that can implement multipath load balancing according to the dynamic changes of network status. The following objectives are achieved, including the lowest average data flow transmission latency, data flow tail latency, latency jitter, minimized network packet loss, and maximized network bandwidth utilization.

Problem A timeline:

Dec 11, 2023

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Registration begins

Dec 26, 2023

20:00(UTC+08:00)

Problem A released

Jan 30, 2024

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Last day of
registration
and code submission

Feb 2, 2024

Round 1 results released

(View the Final standings)

Feb 7, 2024

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Last day of article submission

Mar 15, 2024

Round 2 results released

(View the Final standings)

The team leader scans the Problem A QR code or click the Link to create a team
(Each team member scans the team's QR code shared by the team leader to register after creating the team successfully)
Scan the QR code or click the Link of Challenge webpage on Kattis to coding

Problem B

Spatial Estimation and Separation

Problem B introduction:

In the field of information technology, the issue of generating and jointly processing multi-dimensional data is becoming increasingly common with the enhancement of hardware deployment capabilities. There exists one category of classic issues in this area, known as subspace analysis. It includes analysis on the characteristics of data space to obtain essential information on low dimensions and also includes subsequent processing (such as enhancement or suppression) of this information. This topic focuses on an important issue in subspace analysis: accurate separation and estimation of target linear subspaces in a full-dimensional matrix space. At the core of this interactive topic is to explore the design of solutions for separating and estimating target linear subspaces. As the target linear subspace may be obscured by interfering linear subspaces (that is, other components in the space), participants need to accurately separate and estimate the target subspace with a black box system (linear-nonlinear-linear system). The difference between target and interfering linear subspaces is their respective spatial characteristics. The input design of the black box system can help accelerate the subspace separation and estimation. Note that this topic requires participants to design solutions within a limited complexity (program running time).

Problem B timeline:

Dev 11, 2023

08:00 (UTC+08:00)

Registration begins

Feb 27, 2024

20:00(UTC+08:00)

Problem B released

Mar 26, 2024

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Last day of
registration
and code submission

Mar 29, 2024

Round 1 results released

(View the Final standings)

Apr 2, 2024

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Last day of article submission

May 13, 2024

Round 2 results released

(View the Final standings)

The team leader scans the Problem B QR code or click the Link to create a team
(Each team member scans the team's QR code shared by the team leader to register after creating the team successfully)
Scan the QR code or click the Link of Challenge webpage on Kattis to coding

Problem C

Multi-Parameter Wireless Network Optimization Based on Coverage Simulation

Problem C introduction:

The signal strength received by mobile users is a key indicator of network service quality in wireless networks. This signal strength is influenced by environmental factors, such as building occlusion, and network parameters, including the tilt of panel antennas. To ensure stable network services in a dynamic environment, network operators must continuously adjust these parameters. Typically, they provide network simulation models that capture the quantitative relationship between the parameters and signal strength, enabling them to calculate optimal antenna configurations through model interactions. However, this interaction can be computationally expensive due to the complexity of the models. In this contest, participants are expected to design efficient and intelligent algorithms for network optimization. These algorithms should obtain fitness values (representing average signal strength) from a given black-box simulator but with limited simulations due to their computational complexity. Specifically, multiple candidate parameter configurations are provided for each antenna in the wireless network. The optimizer should explore these candidates to identify the best configuration that maximizes fitness value attainment. Due to an enormous search space and time constraints, brute-force search is not feasible for solving this problem. Contestants can employ various general methodologies like exploration heuristics design, simulation surrogates or search space pruning techniques to address this challenge effectively. Finally, higher scores will be awarded to algorithms that offer better optimal solutions within the specified time limit.

Problem C timeline:

Dec 11, 2023

08:00 (UTC+08:00)

Registration begins

Apr 23, 2024

20:00(UTC+08:00)

Problem C released

May 27, 2024

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Last day of
registration
and code submission

May 30, 2024

Round 1 results released

(View the Final standings)

Jun 3, 2024

20:00 (UTC+08:00)

Last day of article submission

Jul 5, 2024

Round 2 results released

(View the Final standings)

The team leader scans the Problem C QR code or click the Link to create a team
(Each team member scans the team's QR code shared by the team leader to register after creating the team successfully)
Scan the QR code or click the Link of Challenge webpage on Kattis to coding
Contest Rules
Registration Notes
Registration Rules

Participants

Mathematics and algorithm enthusiasts from around the world

Contest type

Team competition + Coaching

Team formation: Each team may have at most four people, including a team leader.

Team leader: The team leader creates the team. As the team's contact person for the organizers, the team leader shall receive any prize money on behalf of their team.

Coach: This Challenge provides a coach reward plan, which encourages participating teams to invite domain-specific teachers to act as coaches and help the contestants improve their problem-solving skills during the contest. A coach cannot be a contestant on the team. Failure to provide coach information during registration is deemed as a decision not to participate in the coach reward plan.

How to Register

Step 1: The team leader scans the registration QR code of the problem to open the registration page, and fills out the required information to complete registration. Once registration is finished, a team QR code is generated, which the team leader shares with their team members.

Step 2: Each team member scans the team QR code to fill out the required information on the registration page and complete registration.

Notes:

(1) A registration QR code is provided for each problem. Any contestant who intends to work on multiple problems should register for each problem separately.

(2) To register for a problem, team members should scan the team QR code shared by their team leader, rather than the registration QR code of the problem.

(3) During registration, contestants who already have a Kattis account should use the e-mail address they used when creating their Kattis account. Once the Challenge begins, these contestants can log in to Kattis with their own account and password.

(4) Contestants without a Kattis account will receive one, along with a password, after registration;

(5) Please read carefully the “Conditions and Rules of Participation” and the “Protection of Personal Data Policy” before registration.

Submissions, Winner Selection, and Prizes
Submissions,
Winner Selection, and Prizes

During this Challenge, there will be two rounds of winner selection and prizes for each problem. In Round 1, winners are selected based on their code. In Round 2, winners are selected based on their code and articles. This section provides information about submission requirements, winner selection rules, and the prizes for Round 1 and Round 2. For more information about the timeline of each problem, see the "About the Problems" section.

Notes:

(1) Given that writing an article takes time, the last day of article submission is one week later than the last day of code submission. Please keep the deadline for article submission in mind and make necessary preparations.

(2) If submissions are found to be too similar during the review, the relevant teams may be disqualified.

(3) Applicable time zone for all problems: UTC+08:00.

Outstanding teams in Round 1: Top 20 teams

(1) Contestants log in to Kattis to submit code for the problem before the deadline.

(2) The review team for the problem performs a review based on the rank lists on Kattis, and announces the list of winners in Round 1 on this website. See the “About the Problems” section – Problem timeline – Round 1 results released.

(3) Prizes for Round 1 (All amounts post-tax):

Top 1–3 teams:

EUR6,000 per team

Top 4–10 teams:

EUR3,000 per team

Top 11–20 teams:

EUR1,000 per team

Top 100 teams and their coaches:

One T-shirt per person

Outstanding teams in Round 2: Top 40 teams
(selected based on code and articles) and their coaches

(1) After Round 1 results are announced, each of the top 40 teams must write an article using the template and submit it in PDF format to challenge4IMC@huawei.com before the deadline. Teams that fail to submit an article before the deadline will be disqualified from consideration during Round 2. Click here to download the template .

(2) The review teams of problems read and score the articles based on their abstract, assumptions and symbols, analysis of the problem, model building, model solving, model summarizing, test results description, references and appendices, and structure and typesetting.

(3) In Round 2, the total score is 100 points, with 60 allocated to the code submitted in Round 1, and 40 allocated to the article submitted in Round 2.

(4) Prizes for Round 2 (All amounts post-tax):

Top 1 team:

EUR4,000 for the team,
EUR1,500 for the coach

Top 2–4 teams:

EUR2,000 per team,
EUR1,000 per coach

Top 5–10 teams:

EUR1,000 per team,
EUR800 per coach

Top 11–20 teams:

EUR800 per team,
EUR500 per coach

Top 21–40 teams and coaches:

One HUAWEI FreeBuds
per person

(5) Coach reward plan for the coaches of outstanding teams in Round 2:

Within two weeks after Round 2 results are announced, coaches of the top 40 teams should submit a summary of their coaching experience using the template to challenge4IMC@huawei.com. Failure to provide a summary of coaching experience on time is deemed as a decision not to participate in the coach reward plan.

(6) The Round 2 results will be released on this website. See the “About the Problems” section – Problem timeline – Round 2 results released.

In addition to the above prizes, the top 100 teams will also be given opportunities to meet Fields medalists and problem authors face to face, and visit Huawei's campuses around the world.

Contact Us
If you have any questions about this contest, please contact us at   challenge4IMC@huawei.com