A World Unconnected
Connecting the 4.4 billion unconnected

Connecting the 4.4 billion unconnected

By Stanley Cao & Julia Yao

Three out of every five people are not online, an almost unfathomable number to those of us who enjoy the privileges of broadband connection, but closure of this gap will require more than just wire, power and spectrum. The unconnected often lack the skills, means or incentives to utilize the Internet, or the helping hand to acquire them. Where do these unconnected people live? Why are they not connected? What can we do about it?

Connecting the countryside

Connecting the countryside

By Cathy Xue & Joyce Fan

The digital divide very much follows the same lines that divide town versus country, and bridging one will help bridge the other in many areas, including education, information, and healthcare. However, this is not just a case of doing the right thing. There is a business case to be made here; as urban markets are saturating, the rural unconnected represent a massive untapped market for the savvy telco. Operators must think outside the box to create new business models that can sustain rural markets and bring benefits to the whole industry.

The role of the Broadband Commission in connecting the unconnected

The role of the Broadband Commission in connecting the unconnected

By Dr Hamadoun I. Touré, Secretary-General, ITU

The role of the Broadband Commission in connecting the unconnectedThere are well over four billion people who are still offline, and most of them are living in developing countries. This is why ITU and UNESCO set up the Broadband Commission for Digital Development in 2010 – to advocate for increased access to broadband infrastructure and applications, as a means to accelerate progress towards meeting the Millennium Development Goals. Since then, the Broadband Commission has been a central driver of dialogue and actions to make broadband more available and affordable everywhere.

Coordinated infrastructure construction: A path to U2BB

Coordinated infrastructure construction: A path to U2BB

By Liu Yajun

Despite the enormous sums that have been spent over the last twenty years on telco infrastructure, six billion people, either by choice or circumstance, still are not utilizing broadband. Traffic increases among the connected are not yielding enough revenue, and raising prices does little to help the unconnected get online. However, money can be saved if telcos can work together with their fellow utilities.

Bringing the golden years online

Bringing the golden years online

By Michael Huang, Pearl Zhu & Fiona Pan

Connecting to the Internet has emerged as a basic human need, and perhaps the one most poorly served at present among senior citizens. Modern living has turned the old support systems upside-down, leaving a lot of people on their own, in poor health and with minimal support, and their numbers are growing.

Ubiquitous connection

Ubiquitous connection

By Lucy Li & Linda Xu

The rapid development of cloud computing, mobile broadband, and the Internet of things (IOT) is propelling the world into the digital age, but a lack of network coverage in many of the world's remote and underdeveloped regions continues to hold back a significant of people from enjoying the privileges of connected living.

BT: Building a better future

BT: Building a better future

By Anna Easton

Providing connectivity alone is not enough to bridge the digital divide. For the digitally disadvantaged, additional measures are required. British Telecom (BT) is proud to support a range of initiatives around the world designed to make the Internet available to millions of people who otherwise would not enjoy access.

dtac: On the way to 'Internet for all'

dtac: On the way to "Internet for all"

By Julia Yao & Joyce Fan

dtac has a vision of "Internet for all", with access expanded to every part of the country. However, "Internet for All" is not as straightforward as it sounds, and should be accomplished by addressing the needs of various segments of the population that are unconnected.

Wearable technologies bring 'sense' to the Internet

Wearable technologies bring "sense" to the Internet

By Zhang Menghan & Wang Rong

Wearable technologies will change both the business models of Internet provision and the everyday particulars of how we access it. They will supplement our senses and help overcome our physical frailties in areas such as vision, hearing, and memory, making for a future where more and more of us can live up to our potential.

Erasing the divide: A global imperative

Eric Xu, Huawei Rotating and Acting CEO

Eric Xu
Huawei Rotating
and Acting CEO

Erasing the digital divide is not only a moral imperative for our world, but a financial one for our industry, and all its stakeholders. Telcos and OTTs need new customers, governments need growth, the unconnected need netizenship - a better connected world benefits us all.
The future is here, it's just not everywhere. New thinking and new business models are creating a world of endless possibilities. By bringing people, ideas and things together, we are committed to partnering with you to build a better connected world.

WinWin Special Edition
Huawei cloud is a real eye-opener

Huawei cloud is a real eye-opener

At a school for the visually-impaired in Shanghai, Huawei's cloud platform is being used by students & teachers as a tool for learning and interacting with a much larger world.

Bridging the digital divide, connecting the futures

Bridging the digital divide, connecting the future

As part of Huawei's sustainability strategy, our Bridging the Digital Divide initiative is fully aligned with our core corporate strategy: The Pipe Strategy. We focus on four areas in helping society bridge the digital divide: Communications for all, broadband for all, nurturing ICT talent, and the application of ICT technologies.

The issue of broadband network access is being addressed in many countries, but a range of new, more human challenges remain, such as affordability and a lack of digital literacy, according to a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit.

By the end of 2013, more than two-thirds of people in developing countries remained unconnected, including over 90% of people in the world's 49 least developed countries.